5 Easy Ways to Maximize Your Hard Drive Space

Hard Drive

In a world where we use computers for virtually everything from browsing the web and playing video games to creating documents and storing media, it is no wonder that our computers tend to get bogged down. When there are unnecessary programs running in the background, or loads of files taking up prime hard drive space, your computer’s performance suffers. In order stay on top of all your files, we recommend that you follow these five tips to make the most of your hard drive space and keep your computer running smoothly. Remember that you should keep up with this maintenance on a monthly basis to ensure that your computer lives a long, healthy life!

1) Disk Cleanup

Disk Cleanup is a utility built right into Windows that removes temporary files, log files, unneeded Windows updates and messages, and more. While you can manually find and delete these unnecessary items, it is a lot easier to use a program to search them out and destroy them for you. To use Windows’ pre-installed Disk Cleanup application, simply click the “Start” button and search for “Disk Cleanup” in the search box. Once you’ve found and clicked on Disk Cleanup, choose the hard disk that you wish to clean up, and then individually select the file types that you want to delete and click “OK”.
Disk Cleanup

If you are a Mac user, OS X has a built-in tool called Disk Utility that allows you to reshuffle separated packages of files, repair them, and delete them to free up memory on your computer. Using an application such as Disk Inventory X for Mac is also a good way to find out what exactly is taking up the most space on your disk so you can determine which files and programs need to be removed.
Disk Utility
There are also free programs for both Mac and Windows computers that you can download to cleanup your hard disk, like CCleaner. Once you’ve downloaded the application, run the program, and click “Analyze” to search for the useless files stored on your computer. Once the application has found the files it needs to delete, click “Run Cleaner” and it will take care of them!
CCleaner

 

2) Remove bloatware and other unwanted programs

Computers nowadays come pre-installed with loads of applications and trials that may not be useful for most users; these programs are referred to as bloatware, and they are more than likely taking up a bunch of unnecessary space on your hard drive. These applications may be easy to find and remove manually, but there are also programs like PC Decrapifier that detects and removes unnecessary programs for you. By removing these junk programs, your computer’s speed shout shoot right up!

 

3) Delete Temporary Files

Every time you download a program, file, or surf the web, you are inadvertently downloading temporary files and caches. Finding and deleting temporary files is usually easy to do manually. In Windows, most temporary files are located under the “Temporary Internet Files” folder (C:\Users\Account Username\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files) on Windows computers, and are saved in folders as .TMP files.
Deleting temporary files
You can also preemptively lower the allowable amount of temporary internet files you want downloaded when browsing and downloading from the Internet by changing your temporary Internet file settings. Under the “Browsing History” section, click “Settings” and alter the Disk Space to use between 50-250MB.

For Mac users, while Mac OS X already tries to automatically remove temporary files for you, we recommend CCleaner again to help with detecting and erasing all of those temporary files.

 

4) Disable Hibernation

When you put your Windows computer to sleep, your work and settings are put into the memory of the computer and allows your computer to standby and only use a small amount of power. However, when your computer is set to Hibernate, your open documents and programs are stored on your hard disk and your computer turns off. While this is the best power-saving mode for saving your current work and shutting your computer down, placing those open programs and documents on the hard disk takes up a lot of space, especially when your computer is put into Hibernation mode regularly. You can disable this feature and prevent your current work from being saved on the hard disk when you shut your computer down by going into the “Control Panel”, clicking “Choose what the power buttons do”, and determine the mode you want your computer to be in when you close the lid, press the power button, and press the sleep button.

 

5) Erase Duplicate Files



Gemini that will assist you in finding duplicate files and eradicating them, and for Windows computers there is a program of the same nature called Duplicate Cleaner. Be sure to only scan for duplicates in folders that you personally created to ensure that you aren’t deleting any important Windows or OS X files.

How-to Set Up Easynews VPN on iOS

How-to Setup Easynews VPN on iOS

Since launching our VPN service in late April, Easynews has become even more privacy-minded than in years past. While your identity has always been protected through end-to-end SSL encryption when using our HTTPS Usenet browser, we want to keep your data secure beyond your binary downloads. The Easynews VPN has user-friendly software available for Apple and Windows PCs, but additional devices can access the VPN through manual configuration. In this blog post we will be configuring the VPN on iOS for OpenVPN, PPTP and L2TP.

Click the appropriate setup guide to jump to that section:
Sign in to Easynews to view the VPN server list:

 

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HTTP vs. HTTPS – What’s the difference?

HTTP vs. HTTPS

It seems as though the stories involving Internet privacy and security are never-ending, and many nations are strengthening their power over the freedom of the Internet. But are popular websites doing anything about the drop in user views and activity from these censored countries? The answer is yes, and you may not have even realized it.

You probably recognize the commonly used acronym “HTTP” that appears in a browser’s address bar, but do you know what it even stands for? To fully understand the step towards better data management that websites like PayPal, Wikipedia and even Easynews are taking, you must first understand what HTTP is and what it does.

What is HTTP?

HTTP stands for Hypertext Transfer Protocol, and is an application layer protocol. In simpler terms, it is the protocol over which information is sent from a user’s web browser to the website they are visiting. The data that is being communicated between the browser and the website is sent over in plain text, meaning that if someone intercepted the connection between the two, they would easily be able to see the information you were both viewing and sending on the website. This is especially dangerous when users are filling out sensitive information, like a credit card number at checkout on Amazon, or entering location information on Facebook.

The Shift to HTTPS

While HTTPS is essentially the same concept as HTTP, the “S” harbors one big difference between the two: security. HTTPS stands for Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure, and instead of acting as its own application layer protocol, it uses separate protocols called SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) and TLS (Transport Layer Security).

Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome and Internet Explorer browser interfaces display padlock icons

HTTP and even HTTPS are not concerned with how information gets from point A to point B; however, the secure sockets layer that HTTPS uses ensures that the information travels through a safe tunnel to its destination, without concerning itself with the actual data that it is sending. The SSL also encrypts the information that is being sent, which means that the true meaning of the data (credit card numbers, personal information, etc.) is very difficult to be cracked by anyone trying to see the information. Nowadays, the majority of web browsers support HTTPS for more secure Internet browsing. Browsers such as Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, and Firefox will display a padlock icon to identify a secure HTTPS connection to a website. Just like with web browsers, there are millions of websites that support HTTPS so that users can view and send information safely without a third party shoving its way into their business. So what does this mean for Easynews? Well, since we use SSL encryption in our HTTP Usenet browser, your text article and binary downloads are encrypted and secure.

Best of all, HTTPS benefits users with faster speeds and connections than HTTP. This is because websites supporting HTTPS have already been certified as secure and are merely tunneled to the user. On the other hand, the unencrypted HTTP is typically filtered, cached, or scanned, which means there is more data to send over the browser. Want to test the speeds for yourself? Visit HTTP vs. HTTPS to compare web page load times for these two different protocols and you can be the judge!

It goes without saying why HTTPS is deemed the preferred protocol when accessing websites, but just because a website uses such SSL encryption does not totally safeguard Internet users from phishing and other schemes. Unlike a VPN, SSL is an encryption protocol that is used in-browser, meaning that any other non-browser based Internet activity can still be intercepted and breached. Remember that a VPN is an encrypted tunnel and ALL of the data running through that connection is impenetrable to the outside world.
Interested in trying the Easynews VPN? Start a free trial today!

 

Did you take the HTTP vs. HTTPS Speed Test? Share your results in the comments below!